The 3 Big Questions From Homebuyers

Mar 4, 2016

Just in time for the spring homebuying season, homebuyers posed questions to housing experts yesterday in a Twitter chat.

The chat allowed homebuyers to tweet questions using #MyHomeChat. Representatives from industry leaders Wells Fargo, Fannie Mae and the National Association of Hispanic Real Estate Professionals (NAHREP) participated in the chat. Consumer finance media personality Ilyce Glink moderated.

Representing Wells Fargo was Brad Blackwell, Executive Vice President of Home Lending, and NAHREP was represented by Co-founder and CEO Gary Acosta. Representing Fannie Mae was Jonathan Lawless, Vice President of Affordable Housing.

To participate, homebuyers published their questions as tweets using #MyHomeChat. Glink tweeted out questions and the hosts responded with answers to each question.

Questions ranged from how first-time homebuyers can get help to what minimum credit score would be needed to qualify for a mortgage. The hour-long chat was filled with active conversation about homebuying.

Below are some highlights of the chat.

How important is credit score when applying for a home loan?

Does a borrower need a high income to buy a home?

What else should people know about getting access to credit to buy a home?


With many people using social media such as Twitter, it’s important to educate and help homebuyers in ways easy and comfortable to them. The #MyHomeChat allowed homebuyers to quickly get answers to questions they may have about homebuying.

The post The 3 Big Questions From Homebuyers appeared first on Fannie Mae - The Home Story.

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